Monday, March 2, 2015

Fellow Wisconsin Author in Bram Stoker Award Nominated Anthology

Big congrats to all the authors whose work has been nominated for a Bram Stoker Award (R) from the Horror Writers Assn.



  Another big congrats goes to fellow Wisconsin author Christian A. Larsen (author of Losing Touch). 

His short story,"Cataldo's Copy" is in the anthology, Qualia Nous, which has also been nominated for a Stoker Award for "Superior Achievement in an Anthology."

The anthology includes stories from such noted authors as Stephen King and Logan's Run author, William F. Nolan. 

I recently interviewed Larsen for the Kenosha (WI) News. See the preview or read the full story.  


Saturday, February 28, 2015

Original Woman in #Horror

Saw this and I thought, of course! What's Women in Horror Month without homage to the original woman of horror? 





Thursday, February 26, 2015

Women in #Horror Month 6 - We Love Horror!

Finishing up with the last post where I asked female horror authors to share their thoughts on what made them horror fans for  WOMEN IN HORROR MONTH


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The question is: What horror film or book first grabbed your attention and made you a horror fan, and why?

* See Women in Horror Month post 1 with Stevie Kopas, Suzi M and C.A. Verstraete 

* See  Women in Horror Month post 2 with Karina Fabian, Jaime Johnesee and Claire C. Riley 


* See Women in Horror Month post 3 with A. Carina Barry, Melanie Karsak and Lori R. Lopez

* See Women in Horror post 4 with Sarah Lyons Fleming and Chantal Noordeloos.  

* See Women in Horror post 5 - Jaime Johnesee explains why it's good to be a Horror Hag. 

* See Women in Horror post 6  (today) - with Vickie Johnstone, Pembroke Sinclair and Julianne Snow.


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What's interesting is that all three of today's guests were influenced by horror at early ages. 



Vickie Johnstone, author of I Dream of Zombies says a Stephen King book was a big  
influence on her. Maybe because she read it when she was so young.

She recalls, "I was somewhere between nine  and 11 years old. I  was in Junior School and was in the top of my English class. (I'm not sure if I was top or shared as there were other winners too.)  Anyway, the prize was that we were taken by our teacher to the bookshop and could choose a book. I chose Christine by Stephen King. to my teacher's astonishment, but she let me have it."




 Pembroke Sinclair,  author of  The Appeal of Evil and (as Jessica Robinson) of Undead Obsessed: Finding Meaning in Zombies, is a huge horror film fan, so naturally a film made a big impression on her. 


 
She says, "the first horror film that grabbed my attention and made me a horror fan was Aliens. I’m not exactly sure how old I was, pretty sure it was late grade school (5th or 6th grade) or early junior high, but I do remember it was the first TV we owned that had stereo sound.

" I was convinced that a facehugger was in the closet, and it scared the hell out of me. The movie frightened me, but it also intrigued me, and from there my love affair with horror developed. To this day, my goal is to become an Alien Queen."







Julianne Snow, author of  Glimpses of the Undead,  was introduced to horror at a very impressionable age.

 She says, "the first horror film that grabbed my attention was Alien and I watched it when I was three in an ill-advised moment of weakness undertaken by my parents. Admittedly, I didn’t make it through the entire movie, but I do remember much of what I saw that night. I can’t say I enjoyed feeling the fear washing over me, but it obviously had an effect on me."


When I was four, I happened to catch Romero’s 1968 Night of the Living Dead on television and I was enraptured by it. I think it was in that moment, watching the black and white masterpiece, my love for horror and zombies was born.

"It’s a film I still watch and one that still gives me the chills. Not many films can do that—to me at least. I’m not sure I can answer the ‘why’ part of the question—as unique human beings, we like what we like and sometimes, there’s no explaining why that is."


 ***  I want to thank the authors for their contributions. And thanks to all the readers and visitors who stopped by for Women in Horror month - or as it's also come to be known - Horror Hags Month.  
   Hey, nothing wrong with being a HAG (Horror Author Gal!), right?



Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Women in #Horror Month 5 - Horror Hags?


I asked female horror authors to share their thoughts on what made them horror fans for  WOMEN IN HORROR MONTH

Today we discuss what being a woman who writes horror means... 


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The question is: What horror film or book first grabbed your attention and made you a horror fan, and why?

* See Women in Horror Month post 1 with Stevie Kopas, Suzi M and C.A. Verstraete 

* See  Women in Horror Month post 2 with Karina Fabian, Jaime Johnesee and Claire C. Riley 


* See Women in Horror Month post 3 with A. Carina Barry, Melanie Karsak and Lori R. Lopez

* See Women in Horror post 4 with Sarah Lyons Fleming and Chantal Noordeloos.  


* See Women in Horror post 5 - Jaime Johnesee explains why it's good to be a Horror Hag. 

* See Women in Horror post 6   - with Vickie Johnstone, Pembroke Sinclair and Julianne Snow.


Today, we take a slight topic detour to discuss what Women in Horror Month means. It should mean the celebration of women who write horror. Simple, right? But it also took a different connotation this year.  Here's a good take on it by author Chantal  Noordeloos

Jaime Johneseeauthor of The Misadventures of Bob the Zombie,  shares her view here on being a "Horror Hag."




Why Being a HAG is a Good Thing 
by Jaime Johnesee


I'm so excited to be here. I want to thank Christine for letting me guest post on her blog and you guys for reading the post. I also want to buy you all ice cream sundaes, unfortunately my finances prevent that from happening. Perhaps one day.... At any rate, I decided today to speak about hags.

 Hags are typically depicted as old, ugly women that either bully and browbeat or trick people into situations. Women who write horror were recently referenced as looking like hags by one disenchanted author and many women were offended by this. I instead took up the hag mantle because I like to take a word meant to offend and hurt and give it a different face and feel.


I'm a HAG (Horror Author Gal) and I'm proud of it.

 In times past throughout literature hags were generally harbingers of doom, or they were the reason that men were wrongly led to their death. They were portrayed as evil witches of old that would kill anyone or anything to get what they wanted. When people think hag their mind typically goes to something like Shakespeare'switches in Macbeth. They see hags as old crones with thin wispy white hair, horribly ugly visages, and mean and spiteful hearts.


(Image: Three Witches, Henry Fuseli 1783)
           

            Today people prove every day you don't have to be ugly and hag-like to be evil.

  •  I'd rather be called a hag than a Westboro Baptist. 
  • I'd rather be called a hag than be called a liar. 
  • I'd rather be called a hag than be called an idiot. 
  • I'd rather be called a hag than be told I'm a woman and therefore can't write horror.

 If writing things that will horrify someone is hag-like then, dammit, I'm proud to be a hag and am in good company!

 I guess I am just of the opinion that hag isn't the worst thing in the world to be called. I'd rather be known as a hag than known as someone who can't write. 

Let's face it. If looks were what mattered in the horror genre there'd be a lot of amazing authors that would never have been read. 

Luckily, the reality of the situation is that the way a person looks --and what gender they might be-- have nothing at all to do with their ability to craft a good story. 

Stay strong, believe in yourselves, and write the best damn stories you can no matter what. 



* Comments (in good taste) are welcome. 

* Come back tomorrow for the last of  the authors' views on what made them horror fans.



Tuesday, February 24, 2015

#Zombie #Horror Book Teaser Tuesday

Thought I'd join in today in Teaser Tuesday at Should Be Reading.

* See other blog memes at the Book Blog Meme Directory.

What to do: 

• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!


 How about a teaser from GIRL Z: My Life as a Teenage Zombie?  (From Chapter 6)

I listened and quickly understood what she meant. A man yelled and then another joined in. Several voices boomed--dangerous voices.

Monday, February 23, 2015

Women in #Horror Month 4 - We Like Horror Because...

I've asked female horror authors to share their thoughts on what made them horror fans for  WOMEN IN HORROR MONTH


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The question is: What horror film or book first grabbed your attention and made you a horror fan, and why?

* See Women in Horror Month post 1 with Stevie Kopas, Suzi M and C.A. Verstraete *

* See  Women in Horror Month post 2 with Karina Fabian, Jaime Johnesee and Claire C. Riley, * 

* See Women in Horror Month post 3 with A. Carina Barry, Melanie Karsak and Lori R. Lopez

* See Women in Horror post 4 with Sarah Lyons Fleming and Chantal Noordeloos.  

* See Women in Horror post 5 - Jaime Johnesee explains why it's good to be a Horror Hag. 

* See Women in Horror post 6  - with Vickie Johnstone, Pembroke Sinclair and Julianne Snow.

Sarah Lyons Fleming, author of  the series which starts with Until the End of the World (Until the End of the World, Book 1) (including So Long, Lollipops, Book 1.5 - novella; And After , Book 2; All the Stars in the Sky, Book 3), doesn't remember the exact time she became a horror fan, but she knows why.
 "Maybe it was those true story ghost books they had on offer in every Scholastic book order when I was in elementary school," she says. "You know, the ones that had actual photographs of the Brown Lady of Raynham Hall amongst other creepy things. (They’re not in there anymore—the book fair catalogs that come home with my kids are decidedly less frightening.)



"Or it was watching Invasionof the Body Snatchers with my parents. That haunting scream at the end—I still shiver. Plus, the movie had the added benefit of being both post-apocalyptic as well as horror. Or maybe it was reading Pet Sematary at 10 years old. Or my grandmother telling me stories of ghosts she’d encountered.

"Whatever the case, I liked being scared. What I didn’t like, however, was being truly scared.
Books and movies allowed me to be scared at my own pace, by my own choosing. The things that really did live under my bed, the vampires that scaled the bricks of my apartment building at night to peer in my window, and the faceless murderer I just knew lurked by the door to the alley by the mailboxes—those weren’t as fun.

"It could be that the fake scary stuff allowed me to see the fears through and watch characters—some of them, at least—come out on the other side. That way, when the hand of the thing under my bed finally managed to snag my ankle, or the vampires opened that squeaky window wide enough to enter, or the man by the mailboxes climbed those few dark steps, I’d know exactly what to do."

  
Chantal Noordeloos, author of Angel Manor (Lucifer Falls Book 1) and the Coyote: the Outlander series, says that for her, "it wasn’t a book or a film that first seduced me to liking horror, it was a ghost story. I can’t remember exactly what happened, but the trope was a ‘ghost ship’(I think it might have been the title as well), and as a young girl, I found this wonderfully exciting. The story was in a book filled with more innocent fairy tales, and it belonged to my aunt. Each time I would visit, I would ask her to read me the tale of the ghost ship. After that I collected scary fairy tales, myths and ghost stories. I think that’s what got me interested in horror."




 ** As an aside, Women in Horror Month has had its detractors. This year it resulted in a situation where it also became known as Horror Hags Month. Why? Author Jaime Johnesee explains her take on it so be sure to come back Wednesday for that post!